plywould.

Apr 23

Like a got-dang Kandinsky.

Like a got-dang Kandinsky.

(Source: photoshamanism, via tardiscrash)

Apr 22

EC lyrics as fortunes.
New favorite blog.

EC lyrics as fortunes.

New favorite blog.

(Source: armedfortunes)

Apr 13

once again, never not retumbling Egon. Is this Anton Peschka? I think it is.
It is.
It totally is.
I love these works where he still incorporates some of those Klimtian elements but makes them his own… those large flat solid shapes… man.

He was great.

once again, never not retumbling Egon. Is this Anton Peschka? I think it is.

It is.

It totally is.

I love these works where he still incorporates some of those Klimtian elements but makes them his own… those large flat solid shapes… man.

He was great.

(Source: mrharristweed)

Feb 12

spoliamag:

Max Beckmann, Self Portrait in Tuxedo
Beckmann, February 12, 1884 – December 28, 1950



My man Max always merits a re-tumbl (or does now, as this is the first he’s come across my dash).
See also: My man Yves and My man Alberto (also also: my man Egon)

spoliamag:

Max Beckmann, Self Portrait in Tuxedo

Beckmann, February 12, 1884 – December 28, 1950

My man Max always merits a re-tumbl (or does now, as this is the first he’s come across my dash). See also: My man Yves and My man Alberto (also also: my man Egon)

Feb 11

[video]

Feb 03

[video]

Jan 24

dropthosegloves:

A short list of current happenings that are more important than Justin Bieber’s arrest:
An Indian village council sentenced a woman to be gang-raped as punishment for having a relationship they didn’t approve of.
Rep. Steve Pearce (R-NM) explains in his recent memoir that it is the wife’s role to “voluntarily submit, just as the husband is to lovingly lead and sacrifice.”
Political unrest in the Ukraine
There are known carcinogens in some of your favorite drinks.
The justice system once again confirmed that it’s okay for cops to kill unarmed law-abiding PoC for no reason. 
South Sudan has signed a truce.
There are still states that give parental rights to rapists.
A brain-dead woman is being kept alive, against the wishes of her family, because she’s carrying a severely disabled fetus.
Childhood poverty has reached record levels in America.
Mike Huckabee proves to everyone that he’s still a moron when it comes to women and birth control.
The weather is basically drunk right now. 
A bill in Montreal seeks to ban “overt and conspicuous” symbols of religion.
The inflation rate is 30% in Argentina
A second chemical was spilled in WV and the company didn’t admit to it until now.

dropthosegloves:

A short list of current happenings that are more important than Justin Bieber’s arrest:

An Indian village council sentenced a woman to be gang-raped as punishment for having a relationship they didn’t approve of.

Rep. Steve Pearce (R-NM) explains in his recent memoir that it is the wife’s role to “voluntarily submit, just as the husband is to lovingly lead and sacrifice.”

Political unrest in the Ukraine

There are known carcinogens in some of your favorite drinks.

The justice system once again confirmed that it’s okay for cops to kill unarmed law-abiding PoC for no reason. 

South Sudan has signed a truce.

There are still states that give parental rights to rapists.

A brain-dead woman is being kept alive, against the wishes of her family, because she’s carrying a severely disabled fetus.

Childhood poverty has reached record levels in America.

Mike Huckabee proves to everyone that he’s still a moron when it comes to women and birth control.

The weather is basically drunk right now. 

A bill in Montreal seeks to ban “overt and conspicuous” symbols of religion.

The inflation rate is 30% in Argentina

A second chemical was spilled in WV and the company didn’t admit to it until now.

(via wilwheaton)

spoliamag:

John E. Bowlt, Russian art scholar, on why Leon Bakst is his model gentleman: 

“He is one of my heroes, and I like what he did because he was such a versatile figure. He was not only a very fine painter — he did wonderful portraits and landscapes — but he was a book designer, a fashion designer, he was very famous for his designs for the costumes and sets for the Russian ballet company, until 1924 when he died. It’s now becoming manifest that he also was a very fine, elegant writer. He wrote about contemporary life, about ballet of course, about technology, about America, about film. He was also a creative writer, he wrote a novel. He wrote librettos for ballets and movies. He also wrote reviews and conducted interviews for newspapers and magazines. He was a very fine writer, a wordsmith I suppose we could say, as well as being a very fine designer and painter. I think he also interests me because… I’m not Jewish, but he was Jewish, and I was always fascinated by the role of the peripheral populations in Imperial Russia, and the Jews of course had a very tough time in Imperial Russia. I’m interested in the relationship of minority culture, his Jewish cultural background, to the Imperial Center. Then, his character. It’s always impossible to recapitulate someone’s character after the fact, we don’t know him, we can’t know. But I find him to a fascinating character, how he moved in society, how he was able to adjust to society in France, and how even though he’s getting on in years he comes to America in 1922, I think it is, and he loves what he sees. He sees the future here. That’s rare for someone who’s beyond middle age, to wake up again. He’s very much aware of… he’s not only flying high meaning he’s a celebrity, but he’s also very much involved in the local art form. When he comes to the United States, one of the first things he talks about is Indian art. He says American students should look at their local Indian tribal art. He’s a very open, mercurial, versatile figure. That reflects the best of the Russian Silver Age, which was so open in the end, so pervious to outside ideas.”

Today will be Leon Bakst day. On this Tumblr if, unfortunately, not in the outside world. (Although looking outside my Chicago window, it sure as fuck could be Russia.)

spoliamag:

John E. Bowlt, Russian art scholar, on why Leon Bakst is his model gentleman

He is one of my heroes, and I like what he did because he was such a versatile figure. He was not only a very fine painter — he did wonderful portraits and landscapes — but he was a book designer, a fashion designer, he was very famous for his designs for the costumes and sets for the Russian ballet company, until 1924 when he died. It’s now becoming manifest that he also was a very fine, elegant writer. He wrote about contemporary life, about ballet of course, about technology, about America, about film. He was also a creative writer, he wrote a novel. He wrote librettos for ballets and movies. He also wrote reviews and conducted interviews for newspapers and magazines. He was a very fine writer, a wordsmith I suppose we could say, as well as being a very fine designer and painter. I think he also interests me because… I’m not Jewish, but he was Jewish, and I was always fascinated by the role of the peripheral populations in Imperial Russia, and the Jews of course had a very tough time in Imperial Russia. I’m interested in the relationship of minority culture, his Jewish cultural background, to the Imperial Center. Then, his character. It’s always impossible to recapitulate someone’s character after the fact, we don’t know him, we can’t know. But I find him to a fascinating character, how he moved in society, how he was able to adjust to society in France, and how even though he’s getting on in years he comes to America in 1922, I think it is, and he loves what he sees. He sees the future here. That’s rare for someone who’s beyond middle age, to wake up again. He’s very much aware of… he’s not only flying high meaning he’s a celebrity, but he’s also very much involved in the local art form. When he comes to the United States, one of the first things he talks about is Indian art. He says American students should look at their local Indian tribal art. He’s a very open, mercurial, versatile figure. That reflects the best of the Russian Silver Age, which was so open in the end, so pervious to outside ideas.”

Today will be Leon Bakst day. On this Tumblr if, unfortunately, not in the outside world. (Although looking outside my Chicago window, it sure as fuck could be Russia.)

Jan 21

onlyoldphotography:

Henri Cartier-Bresson: Alberto Giacometti, 1961

Giacometti… not necessarily my favorite sculptor or my favorite painter, but definitely my favorite painter/sculptor. Almost always gets a re-tumbl.
The Art Institute has a couple of the large figures (possibly the walking man in the foreground of this photo).
When I came to Chicago to interview for the School of the ‘tute, i wandered through the contemporary and modern areas of the museum until I rounded a corner and there they were, facing off in the center of this little room. They were bigger than i had imagined, but more delicate-looking. I couldn’t resist. I surreptitiously touched one. It wasn’t as cold as I expected (being bronze and all), but there was a hardness that was also oddly unexpected (perhaps because the working was done in soft media and then cast into metal, i don’t know… i said “oddly”).
After I got in, I spent a lot of time at the museum and always paid them a visit. 
They’re still some of my favorite things to see on the rare occasion I’m at the museum… they’re like friends from a very specific time of my life.

onlyoldphotography:

Henri Cartier-Bresson: Alberto Giacometti, 1961

Giacometti… not necessarily my favorite sculptor or my favorite painter, but definitely my favorite painter/sculptor. Almost always gets a re-tumbl.

The Art Institute has a couple of the large figures (possibly the walking man in the foreground of this photo).

When I came to Chicago to interview for the School of the ‘tute, i wandered through the contemporary and modern areas of the museum until I rounded a corner and there they were, facing off in the center of this little room. They were bigger than i had imagined, but more delicate-looking. I couldn’t resist. I surreptitiously touched one. It wasn’t as cold as I expected (being bronze and all), but there was a hardness that was also oddly unexpected (perhaps because the working was done in soft media and then cast into metal, i don’t know… i said “oddly”).

After I got in, I spent a lot of time at the museum and always paid them a visit. 

They’re still some of my favorite things to see on the rare occasion I’m at the museum… they’re like friends from a very specific time of my life.

(via theatrecollage)

Jan 19

crywanking:

early 90s x-men clothing. I am cringing.



I NEEED those striped pants with the X logo. NEED.

crywanking:

early 90s x-men clothing. I am cringing.

I NEEED those striped pants with the X logo. NEED.

(via fyeahsuperheroes)